Fri Dec 5 09:30:07 PST 2014

Who are the interviewees?


Options:

Detail the interviewers and interviewees and number them.

For each interview date, complete a copy of this table. Include the interviewer(s) and interviewee(s).

Identifier Date/Time Name Title What do they do?
Interviewer 1 . . . .
Interviewer 2 . . . .
Interviewer 3 . . . .
Interviewee 1 . . . .
Interviewee 2 . . . .
Interviewee 3 . . . .
Interviewee 4 . . . .
Interviewee 5 . . . .
Interviewee 6 . . . .
Interviewee 7 . . . .
Interviewee 8 . . . .
Interviewee 9 . . . .
Interviewee 10 . . . .
Interviewee 11 . . . .
Interviewers and interviewees for this process

This study is attorney client privileged

The study contains client confidential information

The study is for these limited purposes only:



Basis:

Interviewees should reflect the scope of the effort and risk levels at hand. Specifically, there should be someone present who is authorized to accept risks at the consequence levels identified in the study.

For the entire enterprise, this is essentially always the CEO, or in some cases with inward-facing COO and outward facing CEO, both of whom attend board meetings, a COO may be present and not a CEO.

For studies of divisions or other sub-businesses that operate more or less independently and do not carry liability across those boundaries or involve interdependencies (including reputational or otherwise) with the rest of the enterprise, a top executive of the relevant division or wholly owned subsidiary will typically be adequate.

For studies in anticipation of or as part of litigation, attorney client privilege is generally recommended and an attorney should be present during all communications to assure this privilege is available as and if needed.

For studies involved in producing insurance ratings, the scope should be limited to the sole purpose of making insurance-related determinations. Otherwise, it may induce unnecessary liability or be misused for purposes it was not intended to serve.

This study always contains client confidential information, but that information should not include personal information (other than identities of attendees), details of specific clients (unless vital to proper understanding of the protection-related issues), or other unnecessary details.

Copyright(c) Fred Cohen, 1988-2015 - All Rights Reserved